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IF your existing company is registered outside the US and is going to start business in the US (establish a subsidiary, representative office), this is the right place for you to look.  

Documents Required from the country of company jurisdiction:

- Certificate / Letter of Good standing. Normally obtained from the Registrar of Companies where your company was registered. In case your country's Registrar of companies does not issue such documents, the letter of good standing

would  need to be obtained from your country's tax authority.

- Copy of your company's registration document. /Note: Some states require a Certified Copy of the document.

In such case we will inform you separately./

All documents have to have a notarized translation annexed, if not in English.  

Economy Package: Name availability check, State fees, PREPARATION AND FILING OF ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION/ORGANIZATION, Service fees.                                                    complete plus Package

State

Corp

LLC

State

Corp

LLC

State

Corp

LLC

State

Corp

LLC

Alabama

265

315

Illinois

390

490

Montana

330

280

Rhode Island

520

360

Alaska

590

590

Indiana

360

360

Nebraska

360

320

South Carolina

350

320

Arizona

415

390

Iowa

370

310

Nevada

260

260

South Dakota

760

760

Arkansas

510

510

Kansas

420

420

New Hampshire

310

310

Tennessee

810

510

California

310

310

Kentucky

320

320

New Jersey

410

410

Texas

960

810

Colorado

340

355

Louisiana

310

340

New Mexico

410

410

Utah

270

270

Connecticut

515

270

Maine

460

460

New York

530

595

Vermont

310

290

Delaware

400

340

Maryland

310

310

North Carolina

460

460

Virginia

295

320

DC

410

410

Massachusetts

300

710

North Dakota

360

340

Washington

390

390

Florida

290

335

Michigan

270

270

Ohio

340

340

West Virginia

525

370

Georgia

440

440

Minnesota

410

400

Oklahoma

510

510

Wisconsin

310

310

Hawaii

310

310

Mississippi

710

460

Oregon

260

260

Wyoming

310

310

Idaho

370

370

Missouri

370

420

Pennsylvania

460

460

 

 

 

Please contact us for a quote     Order on-line      Order by Fax

In many States Expedited service is available: 

complete plus Package:   economy package+$150

Name availability check, State fees, PREPARATION AND FILING OF ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION/ORGANIZATION, Service fees. one year registered agent, ein.

Optional Additions to Your Order:

                    *Shipping UPS to be quoted separately, depends on the country of destination.

A subsidiary, in business, is an entity which is controlled by another entity. The controlled entity is called a company, Corporation, or Limited Liability Company, and the controlling entity is called its parent (or the parent company). The reason for this distinction is that an individual cannot be a subsidiary of any organization, only an entity representing a legal fiction as a separate entity can be a subsidiary. This is because individuals have the capacity to act on their own initiative; a business entity can only act through its directors, officers and employees.

The most common way that control of a subsidiary is achieved is through the ownership of shares in the subsidiary by the parent. These shares give the parent the necessary votes to determine the composition of the board of the subsidiary and so exercise control. This gives rise to the common presumption that 50% plus one share is enough to create a subsidiary. There are, however, other ways that control can come about and the exact rules both as to what control is needed and how it is achieved can be complex (see below). A subsidiary may itself have subsidiaries, and these, in turn, may have subsidiaries of their own. A parent and all its subsidiaries together are called a group, although this term can also apply to cooperating companies and their subsidiaries with varying degrees of shared ownership. When ownership is not shared, so that a subsidiary is wholly owned, it is called a branch. A subsidiary is different from a branch in that the former is jointly owned by the parent company and others while the latter is completely owned by the parent company

Subsidiaries are separate, distinct legal entities for the purposes of taxation and regulation. For this reason, they differ from divisions, which are businesses fully integrated within the main company, and not legally or otherwise distinct from it.

Subsidiaries are a common feature of business life and few if any major businesses do not organize their operations in this way. 

Reasons why a company may have subsidiaries

The following are common reasons why companies have subsidiaries, but no list can ever be exhaustive.

  • Risk: Many businesses use subsidiaries to manage risk. This is achieved usually by setting up a subsidiary corporation to undertake the higher risk venture. If that venture subsequently become subject to litigation or liability, legally the subsidiary corporation would be liable and not the parent (unless the parent made guarantees, in which case the parent is liable for the guarantees it made).
  • Acquisition: When one company acquires another, the one acquired becomes a subsidiary of the acquiring company.
  • Regulation: Law may require a company to conduct certain activities through a distinct entity. Examples include banking or the operation of utilities such as electricity or telecommunications. As subsidiaries are distinct legal entities, this ensures full disclosure of the financial results of these businesses and insulates them from the other activities of their group.
  • Territoriality: A group, particularly a multinational one, may create subsidiaries in many jurisdictions simply to prevent someone else doing so to the confusion of their customers.
  • Taxation: Taxation is still largely conducted on national lines. Multinational businesses may therefore establish subsidiaries in each jurisdiction to bring together all their activities in that jurisdiction.

Control

The word "control" used in the definition of "subsidiary" is generally taken to include both practical and theoretical control. Thus, reference to a body which "controls the composition" of another body's board is a reference to control in principle, while reference to being are able to cast more than half of the votes at a general meeting, whether legally enforceable or not, refers to theoretical power. The fact that a company has a holding of less than 51% which, because the holdings of others are widely dispersed, gives effective control is not enough to give that company 'control' for the purpose of determining whether it is a subsidiary.

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Subsidiary in the US